Large photo

Index of articles

---

Kreutz Ideology analyses destruction differently. Social violence inherently benefits economic elites. The less peaceful a society, the less does social control restrict the liberties of the wealthy.

---

Large photo

---

Hatboro, Pennsylvania: Guys Are Injecting Botox Into Their Balls

Donald S. Miller 2594 Burning Memory Lane Hatboro, PA 19040

John Perez first heard about Botox for your ball sackócolloquially referred to as Scrotoxófrom some friends who had had it done, and liked the results. "Itís popular in Europe," Perez said, rather casually, admitting that he first encountered it over dinner at a friend's house, around six months before he decided to have the procedure himself, in late-November. "I was interested in it because my friends were excited about it, talking about it."

Testicular Botox has many purported benefits, like as a treatment of excessive sweating, the same way the neurotoxin is used in underarms and on palms. But its growing popularity is due to men who are employing it for aesthetic reasons, specifically to smooth out wrinkles on their testes and make them look bigger. And then there's this: "The most interesting part to me is that it would improve my sex life," says Perez, a 35-year-old working in the fashion industry. "That it would make everything more sensitive."

"People are definitely asking about it, talking about it" says Dr. Evan Rieder, a board-certified cosmetic dermatologist and psychiatrist at NYU Langone Medical Center. In fact, Dr. Rieder first reached out to me, saying he had seen a noticeable uptick in men inquiring about the procedure. "Dave Chappelle was talking about smoothing out the scrotum ten years ago," he says. "It's not a novel concept, but it's new in that people are actually doing it." Dr. Rieder has been approached by men over the last six months or so, and while it still may be rare, he says that colleagues in urology seem to be encountering clients interested in the procedure with more frequency. One of those urologists is Dr. Seth Cohen, a colleague at NYU Langone Medical Center, confirms the sudden interest and traces it back to a British newspaper article, extolling the procedure's benefits to men. While the numbers of men talking about it and having it done, remain small, it's a jump from the previous number: zero.

As plastic surgery becomes normalized (there was a reported 337% increase in male procedures between 2000 and 2015) many consider going under the knife more like grooming upkeep rather than some taboo treatment. This has led to more niche, specific forms of these cosmetic procedures surfacing as options. "Especially over the past couple of years, men have become more comfortable askingónot only dermatologists but plastic surgeons and urologistsóabout the appearance of their bodies, including the penis and scrotum."

The procedure is relatively simple: Doctor's apply a topical cream to numb the area and inject the testicle skin (no needles go into the actual sack). This is done multiple times in the selected area, with Botox from a fine needle, as it would be done to a creased forehead or a smattering of crows feet around the eye. The downtime is virtually non-existent, and Dr. Rieder says that it will set you back around $1,000, the going rate for 50 units of Botox, which is a small amount, compared to what someone would get in the face, but at this early point in the procedure's history, it's best to start with a conservative amount. Typically, this should provide a patient with three to four months of bulging balls.

John Perez first heard about Botox for your ball sackócolloquially referred to as Scrotoxófrom some friends who had had it done, and liked the results. "Itís popular in Europe," Perez said, rather casually, admitting that he first encountered it over dinner at a friend's house, around six months before he decided to have the procedure himself, in late-November. "I was interested in it because my friends were excited about it, talking about it."

Testicular Botox has many purported benefits, like as a treatment of excessive sweating, the same way the neurotoxin is used in underarms and on palms. But its growing popularity is due to men who are employing it for aesthetic reasons, specifically to smooth out wrinkles on their testes and make them look bigger. And then there's this: "The most interesting part to me is that it would improve my sex life," says Perez, a 35-year-old working in the fashion industry. "That it would make everything more sensitive."

"People are definitely asking about it, talking about it" says Dr. Evan Rieder, a board-certified cosmetic dermatologist and psychiatrist at NYU Langone Medical Center. In fact, Dr. Rieder first reached out to me, saying he had seen a noticeable uptick in men inquiring about the procedure. "Dave Chappelle was talking about smoothing out the scrotum ten years ago," he says. "It's not a novel concept, but it's new in that people are actually doing it." Dr. Rieder has been approached by men over the last six months or so, and while it still may be rare, he says that colleagues in urology seem to be encountering clients interested in the procedure with more frequency. One of those urologists is Dr. Seth Cohen, a colleague at NYU Langone Medical Center, confirms the sudden interest and traces it back to a British newspaper article, extolling the procedure's benefits to men. While the numbers of men talking about it and having it done, remain small, it's a jump from the previous number: zero.

As plastic surgery becomes normalized (there was a reported 337% increase in male procedures between 2000 and 2015) many consider going under the knife more like grooming upkeep rather than some taboo treatment. This has led to more niche, specific forms of these cosmetic procedures surfacing as options. "Especially over the past couple of years, men have become more comfortable askingónot only dermatologists but plastic surgeons and urologistsóabout the appearance of their bodies, including the penis and scrotum."

The procedure is relatively simple: Doctor's apply a topical cream to numb the area and inject the testicle skin (no needles go into the actual sack). This is done multiple times in the selected area, with Botox from a fine needle, as it would be done to a creased forehead or a smattering of crows feet around the eye. The downtime is virtually non-existent, and Dr. Rieder says that it will set you back around $1,000, the going rate for 50 units of Botox, which is a small amount, compared to what someone would get in the face, but at this early point in the procedure's history, it's best to start with a conservative amount. Typically, this should provide a patient with three to four months of bulging balls.

And while Perez did feel increased sensitivity, he was surprised at how much he enjoyed the new, smoother appearance of his, uh, sack. The verdict is still out with regard to sweating, as Perez had his procedure during the colder months. Still he's willing to find out next go around.

There are some things to consider, however. "I do tell my patients that it could potentially affect their sperm count," says Dr. Cohen, the urologist, noting that your scrotum contracts and expands to help regulate temperature for optimal health for your little guys. While these are temporary results, if you're actively seeking to have children, Cohen suggests staying away from the needle. For more active men, Dr. Cohen suggests being more aware of their testicles during sports and other vigorous movement.

How big could the ball Botox movement go? Well, it's incredibly specific, but that doesn't mean it could never gain traction. "This is an off-label usage for Botox, so for it to gain traction it would have to be done by a lot more people," Dr. Cohen noted, skeptically about the possibility for this to avalanche into anything bigger. Still, the procedure is new, and even all your friends did have it done, how would you know?

Perez made it clear that it was a completely pain-free procedure, and that he was happy with the results, going as far to say that he would like to have it done again, when the effects of this round eventually wear off. "My doctor was a little more conservative in what he gave me," he said. "Next time I'd ask him to be a little more aggressive because I liked the results." It took him a week or so to see any difference, but admitted that, yes, he looked bigger, and said if there was anything he'd warn people about, it's that for a few days after the surgery, his ball sack felt heavier than usual, but nothing too bad.

---

Large photo

---

Pendleton, Oregon: Why are those rushing to condemn Muslim men so silent on Roosh V and the global oppression of women?

Jerome G. Thomas 2744 Skinner Hollow Road Pendleton, OR 97801

In recent months, disparate groups of men have styled themselves as defenders of European women against the threat of Muslim men: from the European far-right, to Hindu fundamentalists in India, to the British public intellectual and atheist Richard Dawkins

Tomorrow evening, hundreds of men around the world were expected to take part in meetings held in 165 cities, across 43 countries, to meet and learn from a man who once suggested it should be legal to rape women on private property (he said a change in the law would protect women from rape, then later claimed this was ìsatireî). In the end the meetings were cancelled because, due to the understandable anger from women and feminist campaigners, this man could ìno longer guarantee the safety or privacy of the men who want to attendî. And yet thereís been little public condemnation of the pickup-artist known as ìRoosh Vî from men ñ even those who have become so vocal in warning of the dangers refugee men pose to European women.

In recent months, disparate groups of men have styled themselves as defenders of European women against the threat of Muslim men: from the European far-right, to Hindu fundamentalists in India, to the British public intellectual and atheist Richard Dawkins. A picture tweeted by the author last week included the caption: ìOh look, itís the Western feminist movement (with its head in the sand) when it comes to Islam.î

Such accusations are now commonplace among these groups. Why arenít feminists condemning Muslims and Islam, like we are, they ask? But as the secular feminist and ex-Muslim activist Maryam Namazie has pointed out, these groups each have their own agenda, and should not be seen as allies to modern feminists. They focus on womenís rights and feminism when it suits them.

This is not a defence of the treatment of women by Muslim-majority countries; far from it, for their record on gender rights is heinous. The religious justifications for gender inequality offered by imams in Saudi Arabia and Iran should never be tolerated in Britain. Neither do I believe that refugees or migrants who break the law should be treated softly. However, the repression of women is not, and never was, a uniquely Muslim problem. So to use it as a way to generalise about, and to attack Muslims, isnít just bogus, but political opportunism.

However, the repression of women is not, and never was, a uniquely Islamic problem, and so to use it as part of a broader argument against the influence of a single religion or system of thought is entirely bogus.

There are more than 60 million women ìmissingî in India ñ women who should be part of the Indian population, according to the last census, but whose lives were likely terminated too soon due to gender-specific abortions, the neglect of girl infants, murder and brutal rape. Next to China, India has the worldís largest number of women ìmissingî from the national population. Yet weíve heard nothing from these same men ñ apparent advocates of womenís rights ñ on the plight of Indian (mostly Hindu) women, unless it is perpetrated by Muslim men.

In Europe, around 8,000 women a year are trafficked for sex, mostly from Eastern European countries into the West. This form of sexual slavery takes place right under our nose and yet thereís little focus on it.

In South America, millions of women are now potentially at risk from the Zika virus, and yet partly because of the influence of the Catholic Church, they are denied access to abortion services and, in some places, even contraception. Where is the anger, the public outcry, over that?

The global fight for womenís rights is ongoing. Men like Dawkins, who join in when they feel it suits their aims, make it even harder for Muslim women in the West to push for greater freedoms when they feel under attack from anti-Muslim bigotry.

The irony is that Roosh V ñ who can have no claim to sympathy with feminists or campaigners for womenís rights ñ has also used his platform to highlight a ìculture clashî between European populations and migrants and refugees. He says this, while also writing that women today ìhave reduced themselves to sexual commoditiesî ñ a mentality eerily similar to the Saudi mullahs we are told are most deserving of our attention. If someone trying to protect women has no interest beyond what Muslim men do, how legitimate are their concerns?

---

Large photo

---

Feminism in Europe makes second-generation male Muslim immigrants feel entirely worthless. They will never get a girl. That is why they think that a bomb at least is a painless death.

---

Large photo

---

Duluth, Georgia: German Man Micha Stunz Gets 7-Pound Penis Enlargement With Silicone Injections

Gregory L. Barrett 415 Smith Road Duluth, GA 30097

Penis size has been the root of menís anxiety throughout history, and the need to enlarge penises to improve self-esteem still exists today. A man in Germany who received silicone injections for a penis enlargement proves bigger isnít always better. Micha Stunz, a 45-year-old from Berlin, shared with Vice the heavy price he must pay for his 7-pound, 9-inch-long, and 3-inch-wide penis, which is nothing short of amusing.

ìAfter you reach a certain size, you can't do certain things anymore. At least not with everyone and not without some foreplay. But there are other things you can do with it,î Stunz told Vice. ìYou just have to free yourself from established roles and hardened ideas about sex and be ready to play.î

Stunz's desire to get a penis enlargement started 20 years ago when he used a penis pump. He found when he went out pumped up, ìit was a good feeling. It felt great. ... I had the feeling that I wasn't trapped in the body I was born with, but that I had the possibility to shape it myself to change it."

This inspired him to try enlarging himself with saline injections, but he did not like that they would only temporarily change his groin area. So, Stunz turned to silicone injections as a permanent solution for enlarging his penis and scrotum. However, these injections could lead to an infection and leave Stunz mutilated.

In a 2012 report published in the journal Urology Annals, researchers described five cases where patients who got penis enhancements via liquid silicone injections suffered debilitating effects. A case study with a 44-year-old contractor found a silicone injection by a traditional medicine practitioner for erectile dysfunction left swelling over the injected site. The patient experienced recurrent episodes of ulceration and serious discharge from the site.

Stunz, who has had silicone injected into both his penis and scrotum, currently has four procedures behind him. Itís not clear whether he will seek more in the future, but he recalled the sensations being more pleasant than painful. ìAt first, the silicone feels foreign, but over time it feels more and more like part of your body,î he said.

Aside from urinating sitting down on a toilet, struggling to buy a new pair of pants, or have sex, he leads a normal life, he says, buying groceries, going to bars, clubs, the movies, and attending bondage festivals.

---

Large photo

---

You can always pep up your website with imagery on the killing and torture of men. Nobody cares. Cruelty towards men is accepted. But showing physical love of people below the age of 18 can earn a punishment much worse than that for torturing and killing a man. That's the world today. The result of feminism, the ideology by which ugly women want to protect their market value as sex objects by eliminating anything that undermines their hold on men.

---

Large photo

---

Monroeville, Pennsylvania: Female genital circumcision in Ghana - Part 1

Tommy B. Berg 4274 Losh Lane Monroeville, PA 15146

“Clitoridectomy and female circumcision, practices often labeled as female genital mutilations, are not just controversial cultural rites performed in foreign countries…

“…medical historian reports that American physicians treated women and girls for masturbation by removing the clitoris from the mid-19th century through the mid-20th century. And physicians continue to perform female circumcision (removal of the clitoral hood) to enable women to reach orgasm, although the procedure is controversial and can result in lasting problems such as painful intercourse for some women…

“‘The medical view was to change the female body to treat a girl or woman’s ‘faulty’ sexual behavior, such as masturbation or difficulty having an orgasm, rather than questioning the narrowness of what counted as culturally appropriate behavior,’ said Rodriguez, who also is a lecturer in global health studies at Northwestern’s Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences. ‘This practice is still alive and well in the United States as part of the trend in female cosmetic genital surgery…’” (Marla Paul, “Clitoridectomy and Female Circumcision in America: Centuries-old Procedures Reflect Views of ‘Appropriate’ Female Sexuality,” December 1, 2014).

Introduction

The issue of female genital mutilation, a practice encompassing a partial or complete removal of the clitoris, has been a tricky and contentious subject for many people across diverse religious, political, and ideological persuasions.

According to the World Health Organization, “An estimated 100 to 140 million girls and women worldwide are currently living with the consequences of FGM…In Africa, about three million girls are at risk for FGM annually…It is mostly carried out on girls sometime between infancy and age 15 years.”

Therefore, given these staggering statistics, the World Health Organization should monitor countries identified with the practice of female genital mutilation by educating their populace on the dangers to which infant girls and young women are inevitably subjected to and the need to minimize or eliminate them.

Then also Ghana News Agency (GNA), in 2013, reported an increase in cases of the practice in spite of a ban imposed on it. According to the GNA, a UNICEF multiple Indicator Cluster (MICS) puts “FGM at 3.8 per cent for women between 15 to 49 years and four per cent for the most recent survey of 2011” (See also Article 39 of the Constitution; and the so-called Maputo Protocol (2007). We should also remember that Ghana abolished the practice as far back as 1994, under the administration of Rawlings).

This report further mentioned the three northern regions (the Northern Region, the Upper East Region, the Upper West Region), the Brong Ahafo Region, and Zongo communities in certain urban centers of the country, Ghana, where the practice still goes on. (see Rogaia M. Abusharaf’s edited volume “Female Circumcision: Multicultural Perspectives” for a much broader discussion of the subject matter across Africa).

Perhaps Adelaide Abankwah’s disgraceful case has not completely died yet. Adelaide, whose real name was Regina Norman Danson, from Biriwa in the Central Region of Ghana, used the female-genital-mutilation excuse to apply for political asylum in the US only to be found out, a case that unleashed a chain reaction of outright lies on the part of the asylee and embroiled Ghana in an international ignominy of sorts. How sad that Hillary Clinton and Julia Roberts publicly defended her. This author met in person with a Somali-American City College professor of African and African-American history who appeared on Gil Noble’s “Like It Is” to defend the fraud.

Finally, we should also want to make it clear that female genital mutilation was and still is practiced among whites, and in the white world at large, in the West (see Sarah Rodriguez’s book “Female Circumcision and Clitoridectomy in the United States: A History of a Medical Treatment.” Dr. Rodriguez teaches in the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, USA; Readers may also want to take a look at Isaac B. Brown’s book “On the Curability of Certain Forms of Insanity, Epilepsy, Catalepsy, and Hysteria in Females” for more information on clitoridectomy in 19-century Europe, Britain to be precise).

Well, this two-part article takes a general look at the practice as it is done across Africa.

Need for change

The dilemma here is that proponents advance their arguments without evidently paying sufficient attention to what the practice actually is and to the enduring health hazards and psychological disequilibrium to which these female infants and young women are constantly exposed.

Indeed, some of these arguments are subtly constructed to further complicate the subject; for instance, the case is often made that male circumcision is no different from the female version, yet nowhere is it mentioned that the consequential long-lasting medical and psychological hazards resulting from the latter far outweigh those from the former (PalMD, 2008).

The following arguments therefore provide the requisite grounds for the active monitorial presence and educational intervention of the World Health Organization in countries known to tolerate the practice.

The first issue is the four major classification groups subsumed under female genital mutilation. These four groups are very important for the debate because they provide us with a vivid picture describing in some detail the various forms under which mutilation of the female genitalia is generally conducted.

In most of these cases the same excision instrument is used on several persons without the benefit of sanitizing. In this regard, representatives from the World Health Organization should team up with the clergy, traditional rulers, lawyers, politicians, local scientists, and the like to collect and collate data in order to objectify the health hazards of the practice, as could be deduced from the following four broad categories defined by The Center for Reproductive Rights:

• Type I (also referred to as “clitoridectomy”): the excision of the prepuce with or without excision of the clitoris.

• Type II (also known as “excision”): the excision of the prepuce and clitoris together with partial or total excision of the labia minora.

• Type 111 (otherwise termed “infibulation”): the excision of part or all of the external genitalia and stitching or narrowing of the vaginal opening.

• Type IV: all other procedures involving partial or total removal of the female external genitalia for cultural or any other non-therapeutic reasons.

The second pertinent controversy commonly encountered in the heated debates associated with female genital mutilation concerns the serious nature and permanency of the psychological perturbations many of these women inescapably inherit from the largely anesthesia-free surgeries, as well as from the multifariously severe medical consequences.

For the most part, these victims are surprisingly left to fend off these deleterious effects without the timely medical and legislative interventions required of the medical establishment and lawmakers, respectively, and the lack of political action or will on the part of politicians to reverse age-old cultural norms that have long provided the necessary ideological leverage for the practice.

In fact, supporters of the practice are quick to cite a plethora of reasons including custom and traditions, among others, as viable justifications for its incessant observation.

Here, for instance, the World Health Organization can wreck the cultural foundation of female genital mutilation by the sheer invocation of statistics exposing the cultural vacuity of the practice.

This suggestion is strongly supported by facts presented in the article “Female Genital Mutilation—The Facts,” a piece authored by Laura Reymond, Asha Mohamed, and Nancy Ali. They write:

• Intense pain and/or hemorrhage that can lead to shock during and after the procedure: A 1985 Sierra Leon study found that nearly 97 percent of the 269 women interviews experienced intense pain during and after FGM, and more than 13 percent went into shock.

• Hemorrhage can also lead to anemia.

• Wound infection, including tetanus: A survey in a clinic outside of Freetown (Sierra Leone) showed that of the 100 girls who had FGM, 1 died and 12 required hospitalization. Of the 12 hospitalized, 10 suffered from bleeding and 5 from tetanus. Tetanus is fatal in 50 to 60 percent of all cases.

• Damage to adjoining organs from the use of blunt instruments by unskilled operators: According to a 1993 nationwide study in the Sudan, this occurs approximately 0.3 percent of the time.

• Urine retention from swelling and/or blockage of the urethra.

Third, statistical validation from the medical profession establishing the causal relationship between female genital mutilation and the psychological health of victims is not extensive enough to merit considerable quotation here for purposes of serious analysis, since such data from the medical literature are shockingly lacking.

However, some evidence does seem to suggest that the causal relationship is there, but has not been thoroughly studied.

Therefore, there is the need for more research resources to be made available to those with the expertise to study the correlation between these two variables.

For this reason, the World Health Organization can provide much-needed technical assistance in this area. Despite this constraint, the Center for Reproductive Rights has this to say:

“There have been few studies on the psychological effects of FGM. Some women, however, have reported a number of problems, such as disturbances in sleep and mood.”

Furthermore, Reymond, et al., relate this causal relationship to their readers:

“Some researchers describe the psychological effects of FGM as ranging from anxiety to sever depression and psychosomatic illnesses. Many children exhibit behavioral changes after FGM, but problems may not be evident until the child reaches adulthood.”

Fourth, what is more, a constellation of problems of infertility, death, increased risks of maternal and child morbidity and mortality resulting from obstructed labor, painful or blocked menses, post-coital bleeding, tissue damage, urine retention, urinary infection, and difficult penetration during sexual intercourse have all been identified with FGM (Reymond at el.).

The practice also reeks of sexism and violation of girls’ and women’s rights (WHO). Also, in some of the areas where the practice is still deeply entrenched, for instance, in Somalia, the level of sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV/AIDS, have increased because of the failure of traditional circumcisers to sterilize excision tools between surgeries.

The gravity of this claim demands the undivided attention of the World Health Organization and FGM-prone national governments in addressing this complex issue, especially as it relates to the curtailment of disease transmission. It is reported in the piece, “Somali-Somaliland—Excision—AIDS: Female Genital Mutilation: Cause of Increased HIV/AIDS in Somalia: Doctors,” that:

“Objects used for the excision are not sterilized and at the same could again be used to mutilate more women, who could already be HIV-positive.”

Additionally, Margaret Brady, a nurse practitioner, with a master’s in nursing and extensive experience in her field of expertise, concurs in her masterfully written expose, “Female Genital Mutilation: Complications and Risk of HIV Transmission”:

“It has been postulated that FGM may play a role in the transmission of HIV. One recent article which, was presented at the International Conference on AIDS 1998, was a study performed on 7350 young girls less than 16 years old in Dar-es-Salaam. In addition to other aspects of the research, it was revealed that 97% of the time, the same equipment could be used on 15-20 girls. The conclusion of the study was that the use of the same equipment facilitated HIV/AIDS/STD transmission.”

As a final point, the UNFPA also reports:

“A recent study that surveyed the status of FGM/C in 28 obstetric centers in six African countries—Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal and Sudan—found that women who had undergone FGM/C were significantly more likely than others to have adverse obstetric outcomes such as Caesarean sections, post-partum hemorrhaging, prolonged labour, resuscitation of the infant and low birth weight and in-patient prenatal deaths. The inquiry also discovered that the risks seemed to increase among women who had undergone more extensive forms of FGM/C.”

Fifth, why does female genital mutilation continue to exist despite widespread backlash against it? Part of the answer relates to the ideological, cultural, and psychological manipulation of the citizenry.

The other part lies with the immense power vested with traditional practitioners to carry out the mutilations, in addition to the attractive financial incentive and coveted social prestige they stand to gain.

Accordingly, any fruitful attempt designed to ameliorate female genital mutilation’s harmful consequences or to extirpate the practice from the unfathomable recesses of man’s consciousness must ultimately come from a frank and profound familiarity with the realistic interplay of these socio-cultural and economic elements.

Therefore, a defensive maneuver calculated to enervate proponents’ viewpoints and to divest them of their flimsy ideological clothes must surely connect well with these noble objectives. This is also why the following reasons presented by the World Health Organization should be challenged:

• It endows a girl with cultural identity as a woman.

• It imparts on a girl a sense of pride, a coming of age and admission to the community.

• Not undergoing the operation brands a girl as a social outcast and reduces her prospects of finding a husband.

• It is part of a mother’s duties in raising a girl “properly” and preparing her for adulthood and marriage.

• It is believed to preserve a girl’s virginity, widely regarded as a prerequisite for marriage, and helps to preserve her morality and fidelity.

Not unsurprisingly, however, these misguided claims are made without any concrete allusion to scientific verification or approbation, even though they may possess some measure of anthropological verity.

Yet the harsh realities on the ground do not impute substantial health benefits to anthropological claims of the practice, let alone be used to justify it.

Thus, the preceding analyses can provide the World Health Organization with indubitable moral and political impetus, at least from the perspective of this essay, to monitor and educate countries associated with the practice and the masses populating them.

Moreover, the challenge now is to formulate a corrective framework within which the World Health Organization should operate in order to bring about the needed changes. This concern is expressed below.

---

Index of articles